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20130126
20130203
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
? or is the recovery stalling out pat buchanan? >> i think basically it is true, john. the u.s. economy is out of the intensive care it was in, in 2007-2008 but it has been walking the hospital halls ever since. the growth has been growing at an average of about 2%, unemployment is where it was when barack obama took office, we are adding about 150,000 jobs a month, but john, the real problem here is this slow growing is occurring when we have had five straight trillion dollars worth of defense deficits to pump it up and we get $85 billion a month in transfusions a month from the fed and we are still limping along like a mature and quite frankly modest economy. >> eleanor? >> i think these numbers reflect the fact that government is shrinking and the defense department really pulled back in the last quarter of last year. it is a cautionary sign and looks like both parties are kind of sleepwalking their way toward a sequester. the ropes don't want to -- the republicans don't want to give up anything on the revenue side they would rather take a hit in spending. the democrats have protect social
. >> is she right? what difference does it make? or is she wrong? >> i think it does make a difference, john, but i think she handled herself extremely well. there are three questions. why was security not provided despite the pleas. why was help not sent to these guys over seven hours of attacks, and what is responsible for the massive cover-up and fake stories about this video, anti-muslim video. she said to the third, i had nothing to do with the talking points, nothing to do with the military, i take responsibility for the lack of security. however, all these memos and cables that came, they all didn't come into my office personally, but i take responsibility. i think she handled it well, john. and the issue i think is pretty much gone now, and the republicans did it not succeed in what they were trying to cue. >> how would you describe hillary clinton at the house and the senate hearings? what kind of an adjective would you use? >> i would say she was commanding, i would say she was presidential. she came across very much as someone who is shouldering responsibility but she also avoided
chronicle" reporter. jolie o'dell, of venturebeat.com. as well as john myers, kxtv political editor joining us from sacramento. governor jerry brown struck a confident tone on thursday, applauding lawmakers and voters for making tough decisions to balance california's budget. he also pushed for his priorities including education and regulatory reform. now, john, how would you rate his speech and what left the biggest impressions on you? >> well, you know, rating the speech, a speech from jerry brown is really tough to do because it's unlike any other speech you get from any other governor. how many governors go from the book of genesis to "the little engine that could" in one 25-minute speech? this was a vintage jerry brown speech. i think really what you saw here was a little bit of the governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real opti
, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. this week, two united states senators insisted that the justice department come clean. why are wall street's big banks not only too big to fail but too big to jail? senators sherrod brown of ohio, a democrat, and chuck grassley of iowa, a republican, are outraged that the giant banks violate the law with impunity -- laundering money, cheating homeowners, falsifying information -
on stocks. john rogers of ariel investments joins us with his top buys now. and after a week of heavy selling, apple is no longer the world's biggest company, exxon mobil goes back to number one. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." what a week, what a month, what a year. the stock market is on a tear with both the dow and s&p 500 closing at their highest level in five years. some say the gains are seasonal, others point to fundamentals. here's a look at today's numbers. the dow surged 70 points. the blue chip index nearing 14,000 and its record high back in 2007. the nasdaq added 19. and, the s&p gained eight, closing above the important 1,500 mark and advancing for its eighth day in a row. suzanne pratt takes a closer look a what's behind the recent rally in stocks. >> reporter: as months go, january is typically a good one for the stock market. this january, however, is the best investors have seen in years. so far, the dow is up 6%, the s&p 500 has gained more 5% and the nasdaq is up 4.3%. and, if it weren't investors slicing up apple, the nasdaq and s&p 500 would be even better. vet
to interview that future ceo. his name was john mack. it was denied. and it was because there was communication between morgan stanley's lawyer, who at the time was mary jo white, and the higher ups at the sec who included the director of enforcement, linda thomsen. aguirre was later fired for complaining about having this investigation squelched. >> blowing the whistle. >> for blowing the whistle. but the sec was later forced to pay a $750,000 wrongful termination suit to aguirre in that case. but what's so interesting is that aguirre's boss, the guy who killed that case, went to work for mary jo white's firm nine months after the case died. and he got, you know, a multi-million dollar position. it's a classic example of how the revolving door works in washington. you know, you have these regulators at the sec. and they know that there's that job out there waiting for them. so how hard are they really going to regulate these companies when they know they can get that money? but in washington, you know, people kind of shake their heads at it because it's so common you know, that these people, t
of "vision for a new america: a future without poverty." , mariana by chilton, cornel west, john d. graham and how ohio congresswoman marcia fudge. we are glad you joined us for part four of "vision for a new america: a future without poverty." [applause] >> there is a saying dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life by doing the right thing. we know we are only halfway to eliminating hunter. we have a lot of work to do. as we work together we can stem hunger out. -- stamp hunker out. -- hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> where do began. no matter whether you know about education or not, let's turn to the banking world. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment, and we know that because the first three years of life for the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time, and i think there must be an incident or
troopers era. >> john kerry state department? >> better there than the president. tavis: ouch. >> i interviewed senator kerrey in baghdad during one of the worst times in the war in iraq, and i ask, you know there has been more suicide bombings in the last three years in iraq and the past 20 or 30 years, and he said, i warned them not to go in iraq, and i said, that is not how i remember. this is a bit of my own diatribe, but i think senator clinton by their support and now of the iraq war, it feeds these ideas, and they have that moment when they can stand up to this principle that is where that is coming from. all that being said, i think he will be fine. he is not going to rock the boat. he will fall out. tavis: that is another conversation. i interviewed him over the years, but will he get through and should he get through? >> i think he will get through. i think he should compare to other secretaries. i am sure he is as qualified as panetta or someone like gates. i did it will be interesting to see what happens. the pentagon is non favorable to of theck hehagels world. the tric
each other in the game. john harbaugh for the ravens. jim harbaugh for the 49ers. and their mom and dad are here, too. jack and jackie harbaugh. and the big question is, where a the mom and dad are going to watch the game on sunday. the two teams played last year against each other on thanksgiving day. their mom and dad watched from an office inside the stadium. they didn't want to be in the stadium. they didn't want tv cameras to catch their reactions. in speaking with them, you know, they say they're kind of numb during the game. the brothers have a joint press conference today and were pretty funny because they all kept agreeing with each other about their philosophy of football. and they're trying to make this not so much about them, but let's face it, this is a great story. you know? and it was really funny after that press conference, i saw jack harbaugh, their dad, walking down the street and people didn't recognize him, but he'd see a guy with a 49er shirt on, he'd go, go 49ers. next block he'd see someone with a baltimore shirt on, say, go ravens. he was trying to be enthusiast
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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